Displaying items by tag: holiday

Wednesday, 29 November 2017 14:58

Sustainable Holiday Shopping Guide

Photo by Katherine Bomboy


The following information is provided as information for our users and does not constitute an endorsement of any product, service or individual by Socket or the Metropolitan Government of Nashville & Davidson County.


Nashville has many great options for locally crafted, sourced, fair trade and sustainable gifts for the holidays. Here are some suggestions for the season:

Festive Food

If food is a festive favorite for your friends and family, consider creating a menu with savory or sweet courses sourced from local Tennessee products available at local groceries, boutiques and the Nashville Farmer’s Market under the Pick Tennessee logo.


The bounty of offerings for your holiday party or family gathering include fresh fruits, vegetables, herbs, mushrooms, honey, meats, poultry, eggs , sauces, condiments, seasonings, et cetera. Go by and check out the produce in the Farm Sheds or head inside the Market House to see the seasonal offerings of local food purveyors and vendors in the heart of downtown Nashville. Some local non-profits have upcoming holiday markets to inspire your holiday feasts, too!


Consignment, Charity and Thrift Stores

Nashville also has a plethora of consignment stores and thrift shops that offer a second time around for clothing, jewelry, shoes, furniture and household goods. 

Photo by Katherine Bomboy  

Nashville boasts a gold mine of stores to find reasonably priced, sustainable gifts for your friends, family and pets. Making thrift and consignment purchases for the holidays helps keep like-new and valuable items out of Nashville’s landfill, making them a more sustainable option for gift-giving. It also prevents the extraction, transportation, and use of new materials to create brand new products. Buying secondhand and local also keeps carbon emissions down by eliminating long-distance shipping and packaging. Go one step further and consider alternative or no gift bags or wrapping paper. I use a colorful scarf or reusable tote bags to disguise holiday bounty for family and friends.


Sustainable Experiences and Tours

Consider giving an experience rather than a thing this year. Sustainable Travel experiences are possible with a little planning. Websites like the Tennessee Department of Tourism offer suggestions for local and regional travel and experiences that will get family and friends outside, active and engaged with people and places. With all the mountains, rivers, parks, caves and attractions available in Tennessee, there is an experience or tour for everyone. For example, did you know you can go on a free tour of the original Oak Ridge Manhattan Project sites and get a history lesson in the WW II development of atomic weapons that occurred in the area? Learn more about Department of Energy Facilities Public Bus Tour here.


Green Gifts

How about a green gift idea that is actually green. Indoor plants bring joy year round and have numerous health benefits for home or office. Interior landscapes improve air quality by reducing carbon dioxide levels, reducing stress, improving memory and mental well-being and naturally adding coolness and humidity to the air through a process called evapotranspiration (USGS, Water Cycle). Don’t worry, there are several varieties of indoor plants that are easy to take care of for those without a green thumb. Many local groceries and nursery carry house plants that have co-benefits for humans such as Lavender, Ene Plant and Peace Lily. Add a colorful bow to the potted plant and you have a gift that will add beauty and health for months and years to come. With all of these great gift ideas that support our local economy and health and well-being, you are ready to give green this holiday season! Happy Holidays!

Photo by Katherine Bomboy


Katherine Bomboy, blog author, is the Division of Sustainability’s Fall 2017 Intern and a Master’s Degree Candidate in Sustainability at Lipscomb University. She is fascinated by how people make decisions surrounding sustainability issues. You can reach her at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Published in Blogs
Wednesday, 25 October 2017 13:18

Happy Hallow-Green!

 Halloween is full of creativity and spooky fun. This year, make sure the holiday is a treat – not a trick – for the planet, by following these six Green Halloween tips.

1.       Secondhand or Upcycled Costume


Even scarier than the pricetag of a brand new Halloween costume may be environmental cost it exacts. It takes energy, water, and other natural resources to make costumes. Imagine buying new clothes that you only wear once; that’s essentially what many of us do at Halloween. Instead of buying new, consider sourcing your costume from a second hand store, or creating your own out of items you already have around the house. This is an opportunity to save money, get creative, and guarantee a one-of-a-kind costume!

2.       Sustainable Décor


Plastic spiders, glittery witches, and synthetic skeletons are fun, but their production, shipping, and disposal all take a toll on the environment. If you deck out your place for the holiday, consider investing in some good quality decorations that you will use for many years to come. Or, get crafty and use items that you already have at home or can source secondhand.

The number and variety of secondhand stores in Nashville keeps growing. While getting great deals, you may also be supporting a nonprofit’s community work. For secondhand art supplies, fabric, and more, check out SmART! and Turnip Green Creative Reuse.

3.       Walk or Bike to Trick-Or-Treat

Instead of hopping in the car, choose the method of transportation that’s healthier for you and the planet. Walking or biking to your trick-or-treat destination or party saves fuel, prevents air pollution, and gives you exercise. Who knows, you may even burn enough calories to justify an extra piece of chocolate!

For a list of bike share stations in your area, check out Nashville B-Cycle.

4.       Reusable Bags 

Just like for grocery shopping or buying clothes or home goods, don’t forget your reusable bags for each of your trick-or-treaters. Like a Christmas stocking, a personalized cloth Halloween bag can become a holiday tradition. Plus, a bag with your name on it helps deter candy thieves… maybe!

5.       Eco-Friendly Candy


Speaking of candy, choose to give out sweets with a conscience. Fair trade chocolate or hard candies made with natural sugars or organic ingredients are better for the planet and the candy consumers. Some candy makers are even using recycled content wrappers and vegetable based dyes and inks. A quick online search will yield a wealth of healthy(ish) Halloween treats that are eco friendly(er).

6.       Compost Your Pumpkin


When the fun is done and all that’s left is a tummy ache from too much candy, be sure you compost your pumpkin. In fact, those leaves in your yard, the dead flowerheads, and your kitchen scraps can all go in to the compost. Doing so keeps these valuable organic materials out of the landfill. In landfills, organics produce methane as they decompose anaerobically. By composting instead, you ensure that food and yard waste becomes a valuable soil amendment in the form of compost.

Metro Nashville Public Works now provides free drop off of household food waste at their East and Omohundro Convenience Centers. And the city collects yard waste, such as brush and leaves, four times per year. If you can’t wait, you can also drop your yard waste free of charge at one of three locations.


Happy Hallow-Green – from Socket! As you observe holidays throughout the year, remember that Socket encourages you to take a sustainable approach to celebrating, whatever the season.

Published in Blogs
Thursday, 20 April 2017 16:51

A Short History of Earth Day

Socket was curious about the origins and impact of Earth Day, so we did a little digging! (But not enough to uproot the tulips!)


When did Earth Day begin?

The first Earth Day was on April 22, 1970 when 20 million Americans demonstrated for cleaner air, land, and water. Thousands of locations, including several colleges and universities, participated in the event.


When was Nashville’s first Earth Day?

 2017 marks the 16th Nashville Earth Day celebrated in Centennial Park. Before that, Nashville Earth Day celebrations we held throughout the community at places like the Cumberland Science Museum (now Adventure Science Center), Radnor Lake, the YMCA, and many more!


Why do we celebrate on April 22? 

The date of April 22 was chosen because on many university calendars, it falls between spring break and final exams. Since college students were targeted to champion the movement, this date accommodated their schedules.


What impact did the first Earth Day have? 

By the end of 1970, “the first Earth Day had led to the creation of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the passage of the Clean Air, Clean Water, and Endangered Species Acts.” Source: EarthDay.org


When did Earth Day go global?

On Earth Day’s 20th anniversary April 22, 1990, the event went worldwide, mobilizing 200 million people in 141 countries to celebrate the planet.


What about now? 

Today, Earth Day has the distinction of being the “largest secular observance in the world, celebrated by more than a billion people every year.” Source: EarthDay.org


I want to know more!

Learn more on all things Earth Day at EarthDay.org and EPA's page about the holiday.


I want to participate!

Socket can’t wait to see you at Nashville’s Earth Day Festival this Saturday, April 22 at Centennial Park from 11:00am – 6:00pm. Visit Socket’s booth to meet our mascot Socket, enter the kids’ art contest, pick up a free coloring book, and enter to win a backyard composter. Our booth, #38, is at the end of our row, right across the walking path from the "Green Market" vendor area.


Published in Blogs