Displaying items by tag: metro nashville

Sarah and Trinity are Opportunity NOW interns with the Sustainability Division this summer. Opportunity NOW is Nashville’s youth employment initiative, working to provide young people in Davidson County access to employment.

Sarah recently graduated from Martin Luther King Magnet school and is headed to Vanderbilt University in the fall. Trinity is a rising junior at LEAD Academy.

Maryam Muhammad is the Division of Sustainability’s Summer 2018 intern. She assists in coordinating the Division’s city-wide initiatives, developing its website and social media presence, and researching sustainability practices on multiple levels. A rising junior at Vanderbilt University majoring in Engineering Science with concentrations in Civil and Environmental Engineering, she hopes to explore the policy and outreach side of developing sustainable systems.

Department of General Services' Sustainability Overview

The ultimate mission of the Department of Metro General Services is to provide beautiful, healthy, safe, sustainable, functional and long lasting public buildings and spaces. Specifically, General Services’ Sustainability Division integrates sustainable practices throughout the department’s projects and operations with the goal to reduce energy, waste, carbon and greenhouse gas emissions while also educating Metro employees and the Nashville community about sustainability.

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The many acres of greenspace managed by Metro General Services represent beautiful landscapes and help protect our water quality. A couple of the more significant parts of the landscapes are trees and green infrastructure.

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Wednesday, 05 October 2016 01:33

The Story of How Socket Came to Life

Nothing empowers a team more than explaining the benefits of all their hard work. So when General Services Director Nancy Whittemore started implementing new procedures for the department – share mini-refrigerators, use the recycling bins, even eliminate unessential small appliances (e.g., coffee warmers) – she was sure to add the ever-necessary “Why?”

Part of the reason for the sustainability efforts within General Services came down from the city of Nashville.

“The [city] council passed legislation that all new buildings and rehabilitated buildings over $500,000 had to be LEED silver,” Whittemore explained.

Then, when General Services was challenged with the construction and design end of building operations, they were in the position to green the entire process. 

 

This, plus the creation of the 2009 Green Ribbon Report at the time, made sustainability a driving force for the department. Soon after, General Services started using sustainable resources for its building construction. Bamboo, a renewable resource that regrows much faster than traditional hardwoods, was used for floors instead of tree-based wood. Recycled milk cartons were used for dividers in restrooms.

 

And many buildings had automatic light sensors installed so energy wouldn’t be used when no one was in the room. But when employees didn't understand why these new procedures would benefit them, Whittemore and her team had to come up with a plan.

 

And Socket was born.

 

"We believe if people understand what we’re trying to do then people will start doing the right thing," said Whittemore.

 

A source to disseminate the information behind these green decisions was essential. Whittemore met with Ameresco Inc., an independent provider of comprehensive energy efficiency and renewable energy solutions for facilities. Their meeting led to an “A-ha” moment, according to Whittemore. “We love trying to figure out how you strategize to get people to buy in,” she said.

 

Their previous efforts – email correspondence, an updated website – didn’t turn on the city’s employees. With the Socket program, employees can understand why it’s important General Services continues to do what it does in the name of sustainability. “We’ve gone from being like the facility police to engaging our community of customers,” said Whittemore.

 

Socket is the outreach program of General Services and is now housed within the new Sustainability Division. Socket provides a platform for the department to convey its sustainability message with the use of Socket the mascot, the website, blog, newsletter, digital kiosks and other hi-tech touches.

 

“If people don’t know, we can’t expect them to understand it,” said Whittemore.

 

Through the Socket program, employees and Nashville visitors alike can learn about the city’s LEED facilities and how to live and work in more sustainable ways.

 

“This is an opportunity for us to tell our story,” said Whittemore. “We can showcase not only what General Services is doing but the mayor as well. There is so much going on in this city.”

 

Several buildings under General Services’ charge also have electric car power stations and bike racks to promote cleaner transportation options.



 

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